Wednesday, September 29, 2010

AYCE PHOTO FEATURE * ART WALKING AROUND L.A.

A LEISURELY STROLL AROUND LOS ANGELES REVEALS A GREAT LOVE OF ART
 TRUE ART LOVERS CAN SEE THE WORKS OF SOME VERY PROLIFIC ARTISTS
DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES IS ESPECIALLY ARTIST FRIENDLY
EVEN THE BACK TO BACK WORLD CHAMPION LAKERS GET INTO THE ACT
AND ODE'S TO THE WORLD CHAMPION LAKERS ADORN BUILDING SIDES AS WELL
LAKER FANS ENJOY ARTISTIC EXPRESSION AS WELL
A MULTI-LEVEL SERIES OF WORKS GIVES L.A. A SORT OF N.Y. FEEL...IN A WAY
NOT TO BE LEFT OUT, FOODIES CAN ENJOY ART FOR THE EYES AND THE TASTEBUDS
GRILLED CHEESE SANDWICH [WITH PRIME RIB] AT THE FOUNDRY ON MELROSE
AND A GOURMET CHEESEBURGER THAT'S TRULY A WORK OF ART * [THE FOUNDRY]
SPEAKING OF "ART-WALKING"...
 TRIBUTE TO A LEGEND A CERTAIN LAKER PLAYER IS CHASING
CREATIVITY STRETCHES AS FAR AS THE PACIFIC COAST 
AND LASTLY, AN AYCE TV EXPRESSION WITH A REAL CALIFORNIA FEEL

Monday, September 27, 2010

AYCE POLITICO * "THE BI-DEOLOGY PROJECT - PART 1" * ARIELLE LOREN


IN CONTINUING WITH TODAY'S "POLITICO" THEME
THIS VERY TELLING DOCU-SERIES "THE BI-DEOLOGY PROJECT"
SHEDS LIGHT ON THE ISSUE OF BISEXUALITY IN MATING/DATING
FILMMAKER ARIELLE LOREN GETS UNDER THE HOOD
AND ASKS ALL THE QUESTIONS YOU'RE AFRAID TO HEAR THE ANSWERS TO!
*MATURE SUBJECT MATTER*

AYCE POLITICO * NO WEDDING NO WOMB 2010 FOLLOW UP * "BRANDALE RAW"

IN OUR FOLLOW UP TO THE ONGOING "NO WEDDING, NO WOMB" DIALOGUE, AYCE POLITICAL HEAD BRANDALE RANDOLPH  
ADDRESSES THE REACTION TO HIS #NWNW BLOG
CHECK OUT PART 1 + PART 2 OF THE VIDEO HERE AND CHIME IN!!

Thursday, September 23, 2010

AYCE FILM FEATURE * "CUBA" * SHORT FILM

Actress/Writer/Producer Mirtha Michelle (Fast & Furious 4, Dough Boys, Jada) show's her lights, camera, ACTION figure in this short gem entitled "Cuba".  Mirtha and  Larnell Stovall (Film Director/Action Coordinator) teamed up on this short that showcases their respective action skills
BON APPETIT!!

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

AYCE POLITICO * NO WEDDING NO WOMB 2010

 "No Wedding No Womb" is a nationwide dialogue officially opening up on September 22, 2010.  The primary theme of this dialogue entails the alarming number of out of wedlock children in the African American community.  On this day, nearly 100 popular bloggers across the U.S.A will blog in harmony on the subject, providing both insight and solutions to the epidemic.

From founder/organizer of the "No Wedding No Womb" movement Christelyn Karazin, comes a FAQ overview about the cause, for all who may question any element of what NWNW stands for:
  • Is No Wedding No Womb! about bashing single moms?
Absolutely not.  NWNW calls for both MEN and WOMEN to put the needs of children first, and advocates that couples abstain from having children until they are emotionally, physically and financially able to care for them.
  • When you say, NWNW, are you saying that everyone should get married?
In my opinion, marriage is the ideal.  However, if marriage is out of the question, NWNW parents are “wedded” to their commitment to their children, providing daily emotional and physical nurturing.
  • Are you bashing black men?
Lord, I’m trying not to.  Deadbeat dads come in all melanin spectrums.  But as a black woman, my focus for NWNW naturally hones in on the black community first. No other American culture has an astronomical 72% out-of-wedlock birth rate.  Only males have the ability to fertilize an egg and create a baby and never be heard from again.  Women hold that embryo, who becomes a baby, who becomes a child, who becomes an adult.  Mothers can not physically be both mother and father, otherwise God would have created us in the likeness of hermaphroditic amebas.
  • When you say, “No Wedding No Womb!” are you advocating that women get abortions?
Urhm…no.  I’m advocating for women to think more of their bodies and their future children BEFORE sperm meets egg.  I’m advocating for men to STOP spraying their seeds all over The Creation.
  • Aren’t you being  judgmental?
No.  I see a lot of finger-pointing and fire breathing from men and women, blaming each other for the mess we’re in.  If those people would look down at the child looking up at them for a moment, and take into account the damage being done, then ask what the child needs to thrive, the question of judging flies right out of the window.  As my friend Roslyn Holcomb said, “Children thrive in families.  Period.  Full stop.”
  • What gives you the right to do this?
I’m a baby mamma’ LISTEN TO MY MISSION: 65535 NO WEDDING NO WOMB-2.’  I do this for my daughter, and my daughter’s daughter, and all the children of our future.

And with that being said, every super-movement, needs a theme song.  The "No Wedding No Womb" theme song has a very organic back-story that has and end result ripe with potential.  Music producer Brian Alexander Morgan provided original music, songwriter/Autism activist Lorraine Spencer penned the lyrics that made their way to vocalist Kyndra + Producer Leland SharpAyce Media Group's N. Maurice Williams along with Christelyn Karazin are Executive Producers and helped bring the vision of a theme song to fruition.  The end result...hear for yourself below!!
No Wedding No Womb Theme Song! by LJpress

ALSO CHECK OUT THIS DYNAMIC SHORT VIDEO BY ACTIVIST-FILMMAKER JANKS MORTON (SEE HIS WORKS HERE)


Tuesday, September 21, 2010

AYCE POLITICO * GUEST BLOGGER BRANDALE RANDOLPH A.K.A @BRANDALE2221

 THIS GUEST BLOG POST IS A MUST READ FOR PEOPLE OF EVERY RACE, CREED AND COLOR * "COMBATING THE POVERTY CRISIS IN BLACK AMERICA"
IS A RE-PUBLISHED PIECE BY POLITICO VOCALIST 
+ AUTHOR OF "ME & MY BROKE NEIGHBOR" BRANDALE RANDOLPH

ENJOY WITH AN OPEN MIND
(COURTESY OF THELOOP21.COM)

Combating the Poverty Crisis in Black America

While the recently released figures by the US Census Bureau under state the magnitude of the crisis of poverty in Black America, there are immediate solutions.   

The US Census Bureau has just released its annual figures on poverty in the US.  (Download the census data here) While headlines everywhere scream and point toward the overall figures of a record 43.6 Million Americans living below the poverty threshold, there is very little focus on the poverty crisis among African Americans.

Out of the 43.6 Million Americans living below the poverty threshold 9.9 million of them are African American. Before we dig deeper into that we need to establish how poverty is being defined by the Census Bureau. The Poverty threshold figures are as follows and apply only to households under the age of 65.

Poverty Threshold for 2009 by Size of Family (Appendix B)

One Person       $11,161
Two People      $14,787
Three People    $17,282
Four People      $21,832

Now let’s recap, 9.9 Million African Americans don’t even meet the above poverty thresholds.  As stated in last weeks post, an overwhelming and growing number of African Americans are among the working poor. In other words, because of many of the factors mentioned in that post many African Americans whom are not considered to be living under the above poverty thresholds are struggling to make ends meet.

The next chilling statistic found in the report is the data related to median household income. Median Household income is different than the average income. The average is when you add everything up and divide by the number of people. Obviously, the presence of billionaires and millionaires would throw these figures off.  Therefore, the Census Bureau uses the ‘median’ to get a sense of the normal income for African Americans. The figure is just as upsetting.

African Americans have the lowest median household income of among all of the races in the United States. The median households for other races are as follows.

Asians:                               $65, 469
Whites (Non Hispanic):     $54,461
Hispanics:                          $38,039
Blacks:                                $32,584

Two more troubles statistics also came from this report. First, a whopping 67.9% of African American Households have incomes of less than $50,000. And once again, according to figures in my last post, it takes slightly more than $50,000 to raise a family in many of the metropolitan cities here in the United States. Of the 67.9% of African American households who don’t earn at least $50,000 in annual income, 23.5% of African American households don’t even earn $15,000 per year.

To put that in perspective, the federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour. Working a 40 per week job at $7.25 per hour for 52 weeks will be approximately $15,080. Yes, just earning minimum wage for a 40 hour work week is a struggle for 23.5% of our households.

That was me being the thermometer, now I will shift gears and become the thermostat. Lets change the temperature.

How do we as a people fix the crisis of black poverty in America? We have to effect a three prong approach.

The three most immediate ways of fighting African American poverty are:
  1. A renewed focus on formal education
  2. The pursuit of 21st century jobs & Career training
  3. Frequent exercising of our collective local voting power
Education

The discussion on the eradication of poverty begins and ends with a renewed focus on education. Though higher education is not a guaranteed ticket out of poverty, there are no statistics that indicate that formally educated African Americans suffer poverty, unemployment and incarceration at the same rate as undereducated African Americans. All of the recent reports, indicate the exact opposite. As race, we need to make formal education a renewed priority in our homes and communities.

In the coming weeks, several of my colleagues will be speaking on public education reform, please be sure to read and review all of the related post on the subject.

The Pursuit of  21st Century Jobs and Career Training

Many of the jobs and places of employment where our parent and grandparents found work are gone. Now is the time and the perfect opportunity to invest and focus on retraining for obtaining the jobs of the future. The new ‘green economy’ has not hit much of America yet. While there are those who would rather have us blame illegal immigrants for ‘taking our jobs’ , many of those jobs are not the kinds jobs that we as a race should desire. As a matter of fact I would argue that we should get ourselves in position for careers in clean energy, sustainable living & construction, mass transportation, multimedia communication and health care. We are and can be qualified to engage in these careers once they hit our economy.

Exercising our local Collective Voting Power
  
Yes, using our collective voting power is a tool that can effect change in our poverty rates. Immediate changes in the two areas mentioned above can be made if African American got serious about their voting power. While we focus too much on the president and what Washington is doing, many African Americans are not holding our local politicians accountable for the present state of our communities.

Do you want to see real public education reform in your community? Imagine 15,000 angry parents in a local school board meeting threatening to oust the entire school board during the next election, if changes are not made to the local public school system.

Do you want to see more 21st Century jobs and facilities for 21st century jobs made available in your local community? Organize a phone-a-thon to your local city councilmen in which he is questioned about the federal stimulus money that was supposedly dedicated to create jobs in your community.

We have a very long way to go to deal with the poverty situation here in America, the quickest way to get moving, is not to continue to go in the same direction.
    

Monday, September 20, 2010

AYCE PHOTO FEATURE * PHOTO SHUFFLE PART 2

 THIS PHOTO-EPISODE OF "PHOTO SHUFFLE" BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE MANY TRAVELING F-AYCE-S OF AYCE
NO PARTICULAR RHYME OR REASON EXCEPT TO PLEASE THE SENSES 
WITH IMAGES CAPTURED COAST TO COAST * FROM LOS ANGELES
 TO SAN FRANCISCO
 (TO SOMEWHERE BETWEEN LOS ANGELES AND SAN FRANCISCO)
 TO BEAUTIFUL KONA, HAWAII
 WHEW!! QUITE THE ROAD TRIP SO FAR!! 
LET'S HAVE A PIT STOP BEFORE HEADING EASTBOUND!!
HOP ON NEW YORK'S OWN STATEN ISLAND FERRY 
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